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In addition to the domesticated potato, there are many wild species that are native to both North and South America. Wild potatoes can be used in breeding work with common potatoes, particularly to introduce resistance to certain pests and diseases. Most are not safe to eat unless you know what you are doing (and maybe not even then). They aren’t particularly dangerous, but they contain high levels of glykoalkaloids, which are the same substances that make potatoes bitter and poisonous when they turn green. A few, such as S. cardiophyllum and S. ehrenbergii are edible as is. Others, such as S. acaule and S. chacoense may hold some potential as foods with some breeding work or with special preparation. Most, though, are only used for cross-breeding with the common potato. In most cases, we sell the species, not any particular variety. You may get tubers of different phenotypes in the same packet. Demand for these species is low and we grow them infrequently and in small quantities. For many of them, we produce less than 20 packets per year.

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